Fort Hunt Park, a unit of the George Washington Memorial Parkway within the National Park Service, has a rich and varied history. From pre-Revolutionary times through the end of World War II, the site served many roles that have influenced American history. Today, the 197-acre site is a popular picnicking and recreational park.

 

CCC Training at Ft. Hunt - Photo Credit: NPS  

CCC Training at Ft. Hunt - Photo Credit: NPS

 

Fort Hunt Park is a microcosm of American History.  From George Washington's River Farm to the Spanish American War, and from a World War I Bonus Marcher's camp to FDR's Civilian Conservation Corps, learn more about Fort Hunt Park's varied history.

 

Special Delivery: POWs arrive at P.O. Box 1142 during WWII - Photo Credit: NPS

Special Delivery: POWs arrive at P.O. Box 1142 during WWII - Photo Credit: NPS

P.O. Box 1142 was a top secret World War II military intelligence facility from 1942 to 1946. Three programs vital to the war effort operated at Fort Hunt: a temporary detention center to interrogate high value prisoners of war; the escape and evasion aid to Americans captured by the enemy; and analysis of captured documents.

P.O. Box 1142 Reunion in 2007 - Photo Credit NPS

P.O. Box 1142 Reunion in 2007 - Photo Credit NPS

In 1946, P.O. Box 1142 was closed, its buildings largely bulldozed and its records destroyed.  But when the secrets of its World War II use were declassified about 50 years later, NPS undertook significant research about P.O. Box 1142, identifying surviving servicemen, conducting oral histories and searching the National Archives.